文学その7

『青空文庫』にある作品を『Google Translate』で英訳してみました。

母の手毬歌:柳田國男(94-126)/1539

ダテというのは質素の反対で、今ならば「ぜいたくな」とでもいうところ、すなわち雨が降っても日が照っても、この椿は土地の人たちのように、ほかに出てあるくことはできないというので、椿の花のうつくしいのを、いつのまにか人のように取扱っているのである。

Date is the opposite of spartan, and now it's called "luxury", that is, whether it rains or the sun shines, this camellia is out like the locals. Because it is impossible to do so, he treats the beautiful camellia flowers like a human being.

お寺はもと戦国時代といったころには、よく身分のある人の娘や小さな子の、しばらくあずけられて居るところであった。

At the time of the Warring States period, the temple was a place where the daughters and small children of well-established people had been playing for a while.

寺の庭は広々として掃除がよくとどき、珍らしい花や植木なども多かったので、椿を人にたとえたということはまだ心づかなくても、これだけを聴いても子どもには興味があった。

The garden of the temple was spacious and well-cleaned, and there were many rare flowers and plants, so even if I didn't realize that I compared camellia to a person, I was interested in children just listening to it. ..

ただこの歌は二句ずつで話がつぎつぎと移りかわり、切れぎれの小さな絵をならべたようになっているので、つづき話を好む今日の人たちには、少しばかり勝手がちがうかも知れない。

However, the story of this song changes from one phrase to another, and it looks like a line of small pieces of pictures, so it may be a little different for today's people who like the continuation of the story.

 古いころの文芸のなかには、こういう形のものがまだ色々あった。

There were still various types of literary arts in the old days.

連歌というものなどは殊にこれとよく似ている。

Renga is especially similar to this.

あるいはこの手毬歌なども、さいしょはもっと長く、もっと連歌というものに近かったのではないかと思うが、母とわたしの覚えていたものでは、この歌はもうこれで切り上げてしまって、そのあとにまるで縁のない、つぎのような歌がつづいているのであった。

Or I think that this Temari song was longer and closer to Renga, but in what my mother and I remembered, this song was already rounded up, and then The following song, which had no connection, was spelled out.

そのあァめに降りこめらァれて

Get down on that candy

お茶もいやいや煙草もいやいや

I don't like tea, I don't like cigarettes

しょんがいなァ、しょんがいな

I'm sorry, I'm sorry

しょんがい婆ァばさん

Shongai Auntie

こォとし九ゥ十九でくゥまァのへ

To this and ninety-nine

よォめりしょとおォしやる……

I'm gonna do it ...

六、しょんがい婆々

Six, Shongai Auntie

 このしょんがい婆さんというあたりから、手毬の手はきゅうに早くなり、歌の調子もまるで変ってくるので、もとは明らかにべつべつのものだった歌を、二つつなぎ合わせたということがわかる。

From around this old lady, Temari's hands are getting faster and the tone of the song is changing, so it is said that the two songs that were originally obviously different were joined together. Understand.

そうして後の方の歌は、ずっとおどけていて、子どもでも歌いながら笑うところであった。

Then the latter song was ridiculous all the time, and even children were singing and laughing.

ションガイナは今のみなさんの「しょうが無いな」と同じ意味の言葉で、もう今から三百年もまえの流行唄の囃しの文句であった。

Shongaina is a word that has the same meaning as everyone's "I can't help it", and it was a phrase of a popular song 300 years ago.

宮城県などでは、伊達政宗にはじまったという「さんさしぐれか」という歌にもこの囃しがついている。

In Miyagi prefecture and elsewhere, this song is also attached to the song "Sansashigureka," which began with Date Masamune.

九州のほうでは長崎県の島々にも、また鹿児島県で開聞岳を詠じたという「雲の帯してなよなよと」という歌にもこの囃しがあり、さらに南へ行って沖繩県の八重山群島などにも、しょんがいをもっておわる哀れな別れの歌があった。

In Kyushu, there is this song in the islands of Nagasaki Prefecture, and in the song "Kaimondake volcano" in Kagoshima Prefecture, and further south to the Yaeyama Islands in Okinawa Prefecture. However, there was a pitiful farewell song that ended with a sword.

海上の交通が進んだために、一つの節がこれだけ広く弘まったことはもちろんであるが、なお一方にはまた、ここに出てくる「しょんがい婆々さん」というような、やや滑稽なことをいう老女なども、この歌を職業にして地方をあるきまわっていたので、こういう手毬歌が女の子たちのあいだにも、行なわれることになったのかと思う。

It goes without saying that one section became so widespread due to the advancement of maritime traffic, but on the other hand, it was also a little ridiculous, such as the "Songai Auntie" that appears here. Old women who say something like this also used this song as a profession and traveled around the countryside, so I wonder if this kind of Temari song was to be performed among the girls as well.

時代からいうと、鎌倉へ参る路にというのよりは、また少しばかり後のことだったろうと思われる。

From the time, it seems that it was a little later than the road to Kamakura.

しィらが(白髪)三ィすじにたァけェながかァけて

Shiraga (white hair) 3 streaks

おォくば(奥歯)二ィまいべェにかねつゥけて

Okuba (molars)

こォれでよォいかとお爺ィさんに問ォえば

If you ask the old man if this is okay

そォれでよォいよい嫁入しよとらァくじゃ

It ’s time to get married.

やァまをとォおればいィばらがとォめる

If you go to Yama, you will get a rose

かァわをとォおれば船頭さんがとォめる……

If you go through the river, the boatman will stop ...

とあって、そのあとまだ十句ほどつづいたように思うが、わたしはもう忘れてしまっている。

After that, I think I've continued about ten phrases, but I've forgotten it.

 手毬の上手だった母のような人たちは、そんな長い手毬歌がおわっても、まだ手毬は消えずにいるので、歌を止めるか初めへもどることはせずに、それへ勝手にまたべつの歌を、くっつけて歌ったものと思われる。

People like mothers who were good at Temari, even after such a long Temari song, haven't disappeared yet, so they don't stop or return to the beginning, but instead go back to it. It seems that the song was sung together.

そのためにいっそう歌の心持が、脇で聴く者にはわかりにくくなってしまったのである。

As a result, the feelings of the song became even more difficult for those who listened aside.

 このおわりに近い文句のなかで、ラクジャという言葉には説明がいるかも知れない。

In the phrase near the end, the word Rakuja may have an explanation.

わたしなどの生まれた兵庫県の中部では、もとは東京で「することが出来る」、「してもよい」または「さしつかえない」といい、または東北各地で「するによい」という言葉のかわりに、シヨウトラクジャといったものである。

In the central part of Hyogo prefecture where I was born, it was originally said to be "can do", "may" or "can't do" in Tokyo, or instead of the word "good to do" in various parts of Tohoku. In addition, it is something like Tokyo Trakja.

他の地方にもまったく無いというほどではないが、わたしの故郷ではいくぶんかこれを使いすぎていた。

I've used it somewhat too much in my hometown, if not at all in other regions.